China eyes Philippines’ strategic eastern shores

China eyes Philippines’ strategic eastern shores (En español al finalizar)

Manila’s allowance for a Chinese state-funded think tank to conduct ‘scientific’ research at Benham Rise has raised concerns of ulterior motives

fter consolidating control over Philippine-claimed features in the South China Sea, China is now casting its gaze on the island nation’s eastern waters opening onto the Pacific Ocean.

Last week, Filipino Congressman Gary Alejano revealed in a privilege speech that the Department of Foreign Affairs’ (DFA) had approved a Chinese state-funded think tank’s request to conduct a scientific survey of the Benham Rise, a seismically active 13 million hectare underwater plateau.

As part of the agreement, China’s Institute of Oceanology of Chinese Academy of Sciences (IO-CAS) will work with a team from the University of the Philippines’ Marine Science Institute. Largely undeveloped, the marine feature is believed to be rich in natural gas, heavy metals, fisheries and other resources.

In 2012, the UN Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf granted the Philippine government’s petition that the Benham Rise be considered part of the country’s continental shelf, thus giving it sovereign rights over the vast maritime territory.

The designation means that although the maritime feature is not part of its national territory, the Philippines enjoys exclusive rights to the exploitation of its natural resources. Filipino fishermen have long sailed in Benham Rise’s waters.

After consolidating control over Philippine-claimed features in the South China Sea, China is now casting its gaze on the island nation’s eastern waters opening onto the Pacific Ocean.

Last week, Filipino Congressman Gary Alejano revealed in a privilege speech that the Department of Foreign Affairs’ (DFA) had approved a Chinese state-funded think tank’s request to conduct a scientific survey of the Benham Rise, a seismically active 13 million hectare underwater plateau.

As part of the agreement, China’s Institute of Oceanology of Chinese Academy of Sciences (IO-CAS) will work with a team from the University of the Philippines’ Marine Science Institute. Largely undeveloped, the marine feature is believed to be rich in natural gas, heavy metals, fisheries and other resources.

In 2012, the UN Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf granted the Philippine government’s petition that the Benham Rise be considered part of the country’s continental shelf, thus giving it sovereign rights over the vast maritime territory.

The designation means that although the maritime feature is not part of its national territory, the Philippines enjoys exclusive rights to the exploitation of its natural resources. Filipino fishermen have long sailed in Benham Rise’s waters.

Alejano and other critics have questioned the wisdom of allowing China access to the area, particularly considering recent developments in the South China Sea.

“We should be careful and prudent in granting any access to our waters, especially with China who is known to claim 80 percent of our [exclusive economic zone] in the South China Sea through its expansive nine-dash line [map],” he said.

Alejano questioned why a similar request by a French nongovernmental organization, Tara Expeditions Foundation, was refused, arguing that allowing the French group access to Benham Rise would be safer since France and the Philippines have no maritime dispute.

Foreign Affairs Secretary Alan Peter Cayetano has defended the decision, saying it is based on existing laws which allow for foreign ships to conduct research in Philippine waters as long as there is a Filipino national aboard.

That didn’t satisfy critics who feel President Rodrigo Duterte’s government has frequently sacrificed national interests for economic benefits from China.

“Allowing a Chinese national think tank to conduct a so-called scientific research over Philippine waters, even with the participation of Filipinos, is careless and absurd,” Alejano said, particularly as China has recently shown “alarming interest” in Benham Rise.

In March 2017, the Philippine government announced that sent a note verbale to the Chinese government asking why there were Chinese survey ships in Benham Rise from July to December 2016.

China’s foreign ministry said the ships’ were in “innocent passage”, a claim rebutted at the time by Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana. He countered that “innocent passage” means crossing from point A to point B and not crisscrossing an area for several months.

In response, Lorenzana announced that he would increase military patrols in the area and move to construct territorial markers.

In May 2017, the Philippine government rechristened Benham Rise, named after a US Navy officer who likely discovered the feature, as the “Philippine Rise” and designated the area as a “protected food supply exclusive zone.” It also prohibited mining and oil exploration in the underwater plateau.

Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonio Carpio, a noted expert in the Philippines’ maritime claims in the South China Sea, described the Duterte government’s decision to allow survey ships to Benham Rise as “dumb.”

“China has squatted in the West Philippine Sea (South China Sea) and refuses to leave despite the ruling of the UNCLOS tribunal. The Philippines would be dumb to grant China’s request,” he said.

The development comes as China tightens its grip over the South China Sea, including over Philippine-claimed features such as the Scarborough Shoal and Fiery Cross Reef.

As of December 2017, China had built structures on a total of 28 hectares in the Spratlys and Paracel Islands in a rapid militarization of the contested maritime area, strategic think tanks said.

The Asian Maritime Transparency Initiative of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a US-based think tank, said that these structures included hangars, missile shelters, radar arrays, and others have been built on the artificial islands. Security analysts see the build-up leading to the possible imposition of an Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) that would consolidate China’s control of the South China Sea, comprising the so-called ‘First Island Chain.’ Some US$3 trillion worth of global trade passes through the waterway every year.

But Benham Rise’s potential importance to China is likely more strategic than economic. Astride the strait between northern Luzon and southern Taiwan, it is one of the main passageways for naval ships out of the South China Sea to the Pacific Ocean.

Benham Rise is also situated in the center of the so-called ‘Second Island Chain’ that runs from the shores of Yokohama, Japan, down to the northeastern shores of Indonesia’s islands and bypassing the US military base at Okinawa that allows ships to potentially reach crucial US air and naval bases at Guam.

Filipino critics say surveying the features of Benham Rise could give China a new strategic advantage, as the waters of the Second Island Chain would give its ships and submarines ample space to maneuver, unlike in the cramped, contested and highly surveilled waters of the South China Sea.

With a government in Manila increasingly viewed as subservient to Beijing’s interests, the survey could not only open the Philippines’ eastern maritime area’s marine resources to possible Chinese mapping and exploitation, but also create a possible new great power flash-point close to home.

By GEORGE AMURAO (ATIMES)

 

 

 

China observa  las orillas orientales estratégicas de Filipinas

El subsidio a Manila para un grupo de expertos financiado por el estado chino para llevar a cabo una investigación ‘científica’ en Benham Rise ha generado preocupación por motivos ocultos

Después de consolidar el control sobre las características reivindicadas por Filipinas en el Mar del Sur de China, China ahora está fijando su mirada en las aguas orientales de la nación de la isla que se abren al Océano Pacífico.

La semana pasada, el congresista filipino Gary Alejano reveló en un discurso que el Departamento de Asuntos Exteriores (DFA) había aprobado la solicitud de un grupo de expertos financiado por el estado chino para realizar un estudio científico del Benham Rise, una meseta submarina sísmicamente activa de 13 millones de hectáreas .

Como parte del acuerdo, el Instituto de Oceanología de la Academia China de Ciencias (IO-CAS) de China trabajará con un equipo del Instituto de Ciencias Marinas de la Universidad de Filipinas. En gran parte sin desarrollar, la característica marina se cree que es rica en gas natural, metales pesados, pesquerías y otros recursos.

En 2012, la Comisión de Límites de la Plataforma Continental de las Naciones Unidas otorgó la petición del gobierno filipino de que el Alzamiento de Benham sea considerado parte de la plataforma continental del país, otorgándole así derechos soberanos sobre el vasto territorio marítimo.

La designación significa que, aunque la característica marítima no forma parte de su territorio nacional, Filipinas goza de derechos exclusivos sobre la explotación de sus recursos naturales. Los pescadores filipinos han navegado durante mucho tiempo en las aguas de Benham Rise.

Después de consolidar el control sobre las características reclamadas por Filipinas en el Mar del Sur de China, China ahora está echando su mirada a las aguas orientales de la nación de la isla que se abren al Océano Pacífico.

La semana pasada, el congresista filipino Gary Alejano reveló en un discurso privilegiado que el Departamento de Asuntos Exteriores (DFA) había aprobado la solicitud de un grupo de expertos financiado por el estado chino para realizar un estudio científico del Benham Rise, una meseta submarina sísmicamente activa de 13 millones de hectáreas .

Como parte del acuerdo, el Instituto de Oceanología de la Academia China de Ciencias (IO-CAS) de China trabajará con un equipo del Instituto de Ciencias Marinas de la Universidad de Filipinas. En gran parte sin desarrollar, la característica marina se cree que es rica en gas natural, metales pesados, pesquerías y otros recursos.

En 2012, la Comisión de Límites de la Plataforma Continental de las Naciones Unidas otorgó la petición del gobierno filipino de que el Alzamiento de Benham sea considerado parte de la plataforma continental del país, otorgándole así derechos soberanos sobre el vasto territorio marítimo.

La designación significa que, aunque la característica marítima no forma parte de su territorio nacional, Filipinas goza de derechos exclusivos sobre la explotación de sus recursos naturales. Los pescadores filipinos han navegado durante mucho tiempo en las aguas de Benham Rise.

Alejano y otros críticos han cuestionado la conveniencia de permitir el acceso de China a la zona, particularmente considerando los desarrollos recientes en el Mar del Sur de China.

“Debemos ser cuidadosos y prudentes al otorgar cualquier acceso a nuestras aguas, especialmente con China, que se sabe que reclama el 80 por ciento de nuestra [zona económica exclusiva] en el Mar del Sur de China a través de su línea expansiva de nueve trazos (ver mapa)”, dijo.

Alejano cuestionó por qué se rechazó una solicitud similar de una organización no gubernamental francesa, Tara Expeditions Foundation, argumentando que permitir el acceso del grupo francés a Benham Rise sería más seguro ya que Francia y Filipinas no tienen disputas marítimas.

El secretario de Asuntos Exteriores, Alan Peter Cayetano, defendió la decisión y dijo que se basa en las leyes vigentes que permiten a los buques extranjeros llevar a cabo investigaciones en aguas filipinas, siempre que haya un filipino a bordo.

Eso no satisfizo a los críticos que sienten que el gobierno del presidente Rodrigo Duterte ha sacrificado frecuentemente los intereses nacionales por los beneficios económicos de China.

“Permitir que un grupo de expertos chinos lleve a cabo una investigación científica sobre aguas filipinas, incluso con la participación de filipinos, es descuidado y absurdo”, dijo Alejano, particularmente porque China recientemente ha mostrado un “alarmante interés” en Benham Rise.

En marzo de 2017, el gobierno filipino anunció que envió una nota verbal al gobierno chino preguntando por qué había barcos encuestados chinos en Benham Rise de julio a diciembre de 2016.

El Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores de China dijo que los barcos estaban en “paso inocente”, un reclamo refutado en ese momento por el Secretario de Defensa Delfin Lorenzana. Él respondió que “paso inocente” significa cruzar del punto A al punto B y no cruzar un área durante varios meses.

En respuesta, Lorenzana anunció que aumentaría las patrullas militares en el área y se movería a construir marcadores territoriales.

En mayo de 2017, el gobierno filipino rebautizó a Benham Rise, nombrada en honor a un oficial de la marina estadounidense que probablemente descubrió la característica, como el “aumento filipino” y designó el área como “zona exclusiva de suministro de alimentos protegidos”. También prohibió la minería y la exploración petrolera en la meseta submarina.

El juez asociado de la Corte Suprema Antonio Carpio, destacado experto en los reclamos marítimos de Filipinas en el Mar del Sur de China, describió la decisión del gobierno de Duterte de permitir que los buques de reconocimiento a Benham Rise como “tonto”.

“China se ha agachado en el oeste del mar de Filipinas (Mar del Sur de China) y se niega a irse a pesar de la decisión del tribunal de UNCLOS. Filipinas sería tonta si se lo permite a China “, dijo.

El desarrollo se produce cuando China refuerza su control sobre el Mar del Sur de China, incluso sobre las características reclamadas por Filipinas, como Scarborough Shoal y Fiery Cross Reef.

A diciembre de 2017, China había construido estructuras en un total de 28 hectáreas en las islas Spratlys y Paracel en una rápida militarización del área marítima disputada, dijeron los think tanks estratégicos.

La Iniciativa de Transparencia Marítima Asiática del Centro de Estudios Estratégicos e Internacionales, un grupo de expertos con sede en los EE. UU., Dijo que estas estructuras incluían hangares, refugios de misiles, arreglos de radar y otras que se han construido en las islas artificiales. Los analistas de seguridad ven la acumulación que lleva a la posible imposición de una Zona de Identificación de Defensa Aérea (ADIZ) que consolidaría el control de China del Mar de China Meridional, que comprende la llamada “Primera Cadena de la Isla.” Aproximadamente $ 3 billones el comercio pasa a través del canal todos los años.

Pero la importancia potencial de Benham Rise para China es probablemente más estratégica que económica. A orillas del estrecho entre el norte de Luzón y el sur de Taiwán, es uno de los principales pasadizos para los buques navales desde el Mar del Sur de China hasta el Océano Pacífico.

Benham Rise también está situado en el centro de la llamada ‘Segunda cadena de la isla’ que se extiende desde las costas de Yokohama, Japón, hasta las costas nororientales de las islas de Indonesia y sobrepasando la base militar estadounidense en Okinawa que permite a los barcos alcanzar potencialmente cruciales bases navales y aéreas de los Estados Unidos en Guam.

Los críticos filipinos dicen que estudiar las características de Benham Rise podría darle a China una nueva ventaja estratégica, ya que las aguas de la Segunda Isla darían a sus barcos y submarinos amplio espacio para maniobrar, a diferencia de las estrechas, disputadas y altamente vigiladas aguas del sur de China. Mar.

Con un gobierno en Manila cada vez más visto como subordinado a los intereses de Beijing, no solo podría abrir los recursos marinos del este de la zona marítima de Filipinas al posible mapeo y explotación de China, sino también crear una nueva y posible área militar.

Por GEORGE AMURAO (ATIMES)